APROACH

When approaching any security consulting engagement we undertake on behalf of our clients, there are a number of underlying principles that are applied to ensure that our clients receive effective advice and / or a coherent design.  Below are some of the concepts and strategies employed by CAPROCK when approaching a security program design or evaluation engagement.

image5201

When approaching any security consulting engagement we undertake on behalf of our clients, there are a number of underlying principles that are applied to ensure that our clients receive effective advice and / or a coherent design.  Below are some of the concepts and strategies employed by CAPROCK when approaching a security program design or evaluation engagement.

CAPROCK’s broad experience in many facets of security design gives us a unique perspective on the industry.  While many of our competitors focus on a single aspect of security, we take a holistic approach toward the design and evaluation of physical security programs, incorporating physical security measures such as architectural barriers and locks; security technology, including access control, alarm monitoring systems and video surveillance systems; and operational considerations such as guard force operations.  Each of these three components have a symbiotic relationship to the other; no one component can stand alone.

image5041

image4051
Concentric castles constructed during the Middle Ages were among the first applications of the concept of Concentric Circles of Protection.

Concentric circles of protection is a security concept that dictates that, as one progresses from the exterior of a space inward toward a central asset being protected, that multiple progressively stringent circles of protection are implemented.  This is a very old concept that goes back at least to medieval times, when castles were built as defensive fortifications.  In fact, there is a specific type of castle called a concentric castle that was designed with this security principle in mind.  Modern security practitioners have expanded on this concept to incorporate the three measures of an effective security program – the ability to detect, delay and respond to an adversary.  A successful security program will provide a means to detect a security incident in progress, perhaps with the help of security systems; and then have physical protections in place to delay the adversary until security operations are able to respond.

CPTED is a security concept that, through elements of the built environment, attempts to influence offender decisions that precede criminal acts.  Research into criminality indicates that offenders’ decisions to offend or not to offend are more influenced by their perception as to how likely they are to get caught than to other factors such as potential reward or ease of entry.  Implementations of CPTED are based upon the theory that the proper design and effective use of the built environment can reduce crime, reduce the fear of crime, and improve quality of life.  Strategies used in support of this concept include natural surveillance, natural access control, and natural territorial enforcement. 

image4841